National Gallery of Scotland Visit

Written by Charleston Academy on . Posted in Curriculum, Wider Curriculum

On the 18th of September, one of the Higher Art classes set off to Edinburgh to gain an insight on their history of art, at the spectacular national gallery of Scotland. The trip was led by Mrs Corrance (Art) and Mr Seymour (PT Technical). We departed the school around 8.30am and after an hour or so we stopped for a bite to eat at the Ballinluig motor grill. Before we knew we back on the road, on route to Edinburgh.

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We eventually reached the Gallery at 1:00pm, just in time for our tour. We were warmly welcomed by the staff and taken care of right away. The class were introduced to Alicia Bruce, our tour guide. She told us a bit about herself, that she was a photographer and studied at Edinburgh College of Art. Alicia explained the rules in the museum – unfortunately like most museums we weren‘t allowed to take photographs in the gallery itself, due to issues of copyright – and began to ask us a bit about what we were studying and if any of us had been to any galleries previously.

The tour was an hour long so we only had time for a section of the gallery. We were taken to the lower floor where we were instantly overwhelmed by the talent and colours. The museum was a piece of art on its own, with each room expelling different emotions and feelings. Alicia showed us that the more we look at a painting, the more we see and feel. We were shown works from the biggest names, such as Van Gogh, Kandinsky and Edvard Munch. In total we saw around 70 paintings. Alicia involved us in the paintings all through the tour, by asking us how the paintings made us feel, what moods were being conveyed, what we thought made the paintings so successful, etc.

As the tour came to an end Alicia put us into groups and asked us to pick our favourite painting

from the tour and to write down how the painting made us feel, what the meaning of the painting was and what we thought made the piece so powerful. For me, I thought the most impressive piece was Neptune‘s horses by Walter Crane (1892).

Neptune's Horses

The tour ended just after two, giving us an hour to soak up the vibe on the streets of Edinburgh. We got back on the road at three and after a long day we arrive back at the school just after 6:00pm.

Mrs Corrance’s Higher Art Class

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